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SERVING SAKE

Chilled or Warm Sake

Japanese Sake is a unique drink that can be served at a wide range of temperatures. Generally, premium Sake like Daiginjo and Ginjo should be served chilled like white wine so you can enjoy the floral and fruity aroma. Earthy, umami-rich Sake is lovely served warm. When you warm Sake, it intensifies the taste and acidity, so it’s essential to choose the right Sake for different temperatures. If your Sake is floral and fruity, then I suggest it be served chilled, and if your Sake is earthy, Umami rich and high in acidity, then it is best served warm.

Deja Vu Sake

How to Warm Sake

My grandma told me that I should never use a microwave to warm Sake, so I warm my Sake using a water bath.
I heat water in a pot to 70-80 degrees Celsius, then turn off the heat. Fill the Tokkuri (Sake serving carafe) with Sake (only fill the carafe to 70 – 80% full) for 5 minutes or so – until it reaches the desired temperature. This way, the Sake is warmed gently, which protects the aroma and flavour. I usually like my Sake served at 40 to 45-degree Celsius. Alcohol starts evaporating above 50 degrees, so be mindful of going too hot!

While a warm bath is the best way to warm Sake, you can, of course, use the microwave.

Put 180ml Sake in Tokkuri (fill a Tokkuri or a suitable microwavable container up to 70 – 80% full only) and heat for between 40 – 60 seconds (depending on your microwave).

We have an excellent solution for all busy Sake fans – Kenbishi Kuromatsu which is sold in a special 180ml bottle. This glass bottle is designed to go straight in the microwave – but make sure you remove the top cap before putting it in. It features a unique shape inside the bottle, which ensures the Sake is evenly warmed in the microwave in only 50 seconds. It is washable, reusable and recyclable.

How to Serve Sake

Chilled Sake should be enjoyed in a wine glass – as you would white wine. Traditional Sake service ware is known as Masu and Ochoco. Masu is a wooden box that is made with Japanese cedar. It used to be used as a measuring cup/box, but these days you see them at Izakaya in Japan.

Ochoco is the small Sake cup. Ochoco comes in many sizes, and is made from a range of materials. Glass Ochoco is lovely to drink from during summer time as it light and cool. Pottery Ochoco is often used for warm Sake.

Deja Vu Sake

Do you know why we use such small Ochoco?

In Japan, it is our custom to pour Sake for each other to show our respect and our hospitality.

So, smaller Ochoco requires frequent refilling – which allows us to show lots of care and attention to the people we are catching up with.

Kampai is the Japanese word for ‘Cheers’ and literally means ’empty the cup’.

SERVING SAKE

Chilled or Warm Sake

Japanese Sake is a unique drink that can be served at a wide range of temperatures. Generally, premium Sake like Daiginjo and Ginjo should be served chilled like white wine so you can enjoy the floral and fruity aroma. Earthy, umami-rich Sake is lovely served warm. When you warm Sake, it intensifies the taste and acidity, so it’s essential to choose the right Sake for different temperatures. If your Sake is floral and fruity, then I suggest it be served chilled, and if your Sake is earthy, Umami rich and high in acidity, then it is best served warm.

How to Warm Sake

My grandma told me that I should never use a microwave to warm Sake, so I warm my Sake using a water bath.
I heat water in a pot to 70-80 degrees Celsius, then turn off the heat. Fill the Tokkuri (Sake serving carafe) with Sake (only fill the carafe to 70 – 80% full) for 5 minutes or so – until it reaches the desired temperature. This way, the Sake is warmed gently, which protects the aroma and flavour. I usually like my Sake served at 40 to 45-degree Celsius. Alcohol starts evaporating above 50 degrees, so be mindful of going to hot!

While a warm bath is the best way to warm Sake, you can of course use the microwave.

Put 180ml Sake in Tokkuri (fill a Tokkuri or a suitable microwavable container up to 70 – 80% full only) and heat for between 40 to 60 seconds (depending on your microwave).

We have an excellent solution for all busy Sake fans – Kenbishi Kuromatsu which is sold in a special 180ml bottle. This glass bottle is designed to go straight in the microwave – but make sure you remove the top cap before putting it in. It features a unique shape inside the bottle, which ensures the Sake is evenly warmed in the microwave in only 50 seconds. It is washable, reusable and recyclable.

Deja Vu Sake

How to Serve Sake

Chilled Sake should be enjoyed in a glass – as you would white wine. Traditional Sake service ware is known as Masu and Ochoco. Masu is a wooden box that is made with Japanese cedar. It used to be used as a measuring cup/box, but these days you see them at Izakaya in Japan. Ochoco is the small Sake cup. Ochoco comes in many sizes, and is made from a range of materials. Glass Ochoco is lovely to drink from during summer time as it light and cool. Pottery Ochoco is often used for warm Sake.

Do you know why we use such small Ochoco?

 In Japan, it is our custom to pour Sake for each other to show our respect and our hospitality. So, smaller Ochoco requires frequent refilling – which allows us to show lots of care and attention to the people we are catching up with. Kampai is the Japanese word for ‘Cheers’ and literally means ’empty the cup’.

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