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SAKE

WHAT IS SAKE?

Japans history of making Sake dates back over 2000 years and there are approximately 1,500 breweries existing today. Sake is made from rice, water, yeast koji (mold), and uses distilled alcohol for the Non-Junmai category of sake.  

Sake is a versatile beverage with an array of flavours and tastes. It has a mild taste with little acidity (a third less acidity than wine), bitterness or astringency. It can be served chilled, at room temperature or warm. It is however highly recommended to keep Sake in the fridge to maintain it’s freshness, or should be kept in a cool, dark, dry place (a wine cellar is ideal).

Both wine and sake are made to be consumed during a meal. Sake is very versatile when it come to food matching. Sake can enhance the flavour of foods, or it can be used to cleanse the  palate.  The big difference between sake and wine is its level of acidity as well as the type of acidity. Sake has much less acidity and lots of lactic acid, not tartaric acid which is in wine. So you feel the roundness, and mouth warming gentle acidity when you drink sake. Wine’s acidity gives you more of a refreshing and crisp sensation.

 

SAKE 101

  • Once opened, a sake bottle should be sealed and stored in a refrigerator and it is recommended to finish an opened bottle within 2 – 3 weeks.
  • Sake is not considered a spirit but does contain 13-17% alcohol content – it is also gluten free and contains no preservatives.
  • Sake making begins with the rice harvest in September, with sake production taking place between October and March (during winter in Japan).
  • Sake is a very versatile beverage and can be matched beautifully with a wide variety of foods such as Umami.
  • There are several categories of premium Sake including Daiginjo, Ginjo, Junmai.
Deja Vu Sake

SAKE PRODUCTION TERMS

Kimoto – a sake made using an older, slower method for the fermentation starter.

Yamahai – a sake made using a simplified version of Kimoto.

Muroka – a sake that has not been refined with active charcoal to remove colour.

Nama – a sake that has not been pasteurised.

Genshu – a sake that has not had water added before bottling.

Nigori –  a cloudy sake that has been roughly filtered or is a blend of clear sake and roughly filtered sake.

Sparkling – sparkling sake can be as fizzy as a sparkling wine.

Koshu – these sakes are aged for an extended period.

Kijoshu – Nearly all sakes have some unfermented sugar. Kijoshu has very high level of sugar.

Taru-zake – a sake that has been matured in Japanese cedar barrels.

TYPES OF SAKE

Premium Sakes make up approximately 30% of total sake production. These are of higher quality, price and complexity. Generally speaking the rice that they are made from are more highly milled and they are produced at lower temperatures and have a longer fermentation period.

Daiginjo – This type of sake is made of rice that has been milled or polished down to 50% or less. A small portion of distilled alcohol is included to make the sake lighter and aromatic.

Junmai Daiginjo – This type of sake is made of rice that has been milled or polished down to 50% or less. No additional distilled alcohol is added.

Ginjo – This type of sake is made of rice that has been milled or polished down to 60% or less. A small portion of distilled alcohol is included to make the sake lighter and aromatic.

Junmai Ginjo – This type of sake is made of rice that has been milled or polished down to 60% or less. No additional distilled alcohol is added.

Junmai – This includes any sake that has been produced with only rice, water, koji mold, and yeast (without any added ethyl alcohol). There is no milling requirement for this type of sake.

Honjozo – This sake is made with rice that has been polished down to 70% or less. A small portion of distilled alcohol is added.

Every day Sakes

Futsushu – This is regarded as an everyday basic sake which contains rice, koji, water and can also include a large amount of distilled alcohol.

    SAKE

    WHAT IS SAKE?

    Japans history of making Sake dates back over 2000 years and there are approximately 1,500 breweries existing today. Sake is made from rice, water, yeast koji (mold), and uses distilled alcohol for the Non-Junmai category of sake.  

    Sake is a versatile beverage with an array of flavours and tastes. It has a mild taste with little acidity (a third less acidity than wine), bitterness or astringency. It can be served chilled, at room temperature or warm. It is however highly recommended to keep Sake in the fridge to maintain it’s freshness, or should be kept in a cool, dark, dry place (a wine cellar is ideal).

    Both wine and sake are made to be consumed during a meal. Sake is very versatile when it come to food matching. Sake can enhance the flavour of foods, or it can be used to cleanse the  palate.  The big difference between sake and wine is its level of acidity as well as the type of acidity. Sake has much less acidity and lots of lactic acid, not tartaric acid which is in wine. So you feel the roundness, and mouth warming gentle acidity when you drink sake. Wine’s acidity gives you more of a refreshing and crisp sensation.

     

    SAKE 101

    • Once opened, a sake bottle should be sealed and stored in a refrigerator and it is recommended to finish an opened bottle within 2 – 3 weeks.
    • Sake is not considered a spirit but does contain 13-17% alcohol content – it is also gluten free and contains no preservatives.
    • Sake making begins with the rice harvest in September, with sake production taking place between October and March (during winter in Japan).
    • Sake is a very versatile beverage and can be matched beautifully with a wide variety of foods such as Umami.
    • There are several categories of premium Sake including Daiginjo, Ginjo, Junmai.

    SAKE PRODUCTION TERMS

    Kimoto – a sake made using an older, slower method for the fermentation starter.

    Yamahai – a sake made using a simplified version of Kimoto.

    Muroka – a sake that has not been refined with active charcoal to remove colour.

    Nama – a sake that has not been pasteurised.

    Genshu – a sake that has not had water added before bottling.

    Nigori –  a cloudy sake that has been roughly filtered or is a blend of clear sake and roughly filtered sake.

    Sparkling – sparkling sake can be as fizzy as a sparkling wine.

    Koshu – these sakes are aged for an extended period.

    Kijoshu – Nearly all sakes have some unfermented sugar. Kijoshu has very high level of sugar.

    Taru-zake – a sake that has been matured in Japanese cedar barrels.

    TYPES OF SAKE

    Premium Sakes make up approximately 30% of total sake production. These are of higher quality, price and complexity. Generally speaking the rice that they are made from are more highly milled and they are produced at lower temperatures and have a longer fermentation period.

    Daiginjo – This type of sake is made of rice that has been milled or polished down to 50% or less. A small portion of distilled alcohol is included to make the sake lighter and aromatic.

    Junmai Daiginjo – This type of sake is made of rice that has been milled or polished down to 50% or less. No additional distilled alcohol is added.

    Ginjo – This type of sake is made of rice that has been milled or polished down to 60% or less. A small portion of distilled alcohol is included to make the sake lighter and aromatic.

    Junmai Ginjo – This type of sake is made of rice that has been milled or polished down to 60% or less. No additional distilled alcohol is added.

    Junmai – This includes any sake that has been produced with only rice, water, koji mold, and yeast (without any added ethyl alcohol). There is no milling requirement for this type of sake.

    Honjozo – This sake is made with rice that has been polished down to 70% or less. A small portion of distilled alcohol is added.

    Every day Sakes

    Futsushu – This is regarded as an everyday basic sake which contains rice, koji, water and can also include a large amount of distilled alcohol.

      SAKE BRANDS

      AMANOTO
      DEWAZAKURA

      ENTER SAKE

      FUKUJU
      HOURAISEN
      KENBISHI
      KUNIZAKARI
      SAWANOTSURU
      SHICHIDA
      TENGUMAI
      TSUKINOKATSURA
      YOSHINOGAWA

      SAKE v WINE MAKING

       

      For alcohol fermentation, you need sugar, yeast and water. Yeast eats the sugar and turns it into alcohol and carbon dioxide.  Grapes have all the inessential ingredients within the fruit (sugar, wild yeast and juice), so grape all by themselves are ready to produce alcohol. When making Sake, dry grain rice is used which has starch instead of sugar. In Sake production, the starch needs to be converted into fermentable sugar. Starch is made up of sugar molecules that are bonded together into long chains. Chemicals called enzymes then break up the starch chain into individual sugar molecules. This process is called starch conversion or saccharification. After this conversion is done, the Sake maker adds water and sake yeast to start the alcohol fermentation process.

        Dejavu Sake Making Process
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